Archive for July, 2009

Jul 29 2009

Coping in emergency and disaster: A new unique graduate program at the University

Published by Editor under Press Releases

Terror attacks, missiles, severe faults at a hazardous chemicals industry, natural disasters - all are emergencies that threaten us every day, primarily due to the unexpected ways in which they are likely to occur. A graduate study program at the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies of the University of Haifa will train its graduates in coping with such threats - from formulating planning procedures and preventative measures to coping with events after they occur and providing for appropriate rehabilitation. Continue Reading »

2 responses so far

Jul 27 2009

Underwater archaeology: University of Haifa partnership with Turkish scientists

Prof. Michal Artzi of the University of Haifa’s Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies was interviewed for Israel’s Channel 1 evening news on July 12, 2009, which was then aired in the US by PBS (”World Focus”) on July 17, 2009.

She discussed the unique partnership that scientists from the Institute have with Turkish archaeologists in exploring the sunken remains of a port in Turkey. The Israeli team were invited there, Prof. Artzi explained, “since we are experts in maritime excavation, to come and teach them and work with them.”

62 responses so far

Jul 26 2009

Israel’s underwater excavations in Turkey one of 10 most important in the world

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 23, 2009  Israel21c

The Archaeological Institute of America has ranked underwater excavations carried out by the University of Haifa in the Turkish port town of Urla as one of the 10 most important maritime excavations in the world. Scientists at the University of Haifa’s Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies, headed by Prof. Michal Artzi, have found the oldest wooden anchor in the world, the remains of an ancient port that collapsed in an earthquake, and even sunken remains of the town itself, during their nautical excavations.

Read article

One response so far

Jul 26 2009

Health Scan: Telemedicine may replace face-to-face therapy

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 25, 2009  The Jerusalem Post

Could it be that in little more than a decade, occupational, physical, behavioral and psychological therapists will not have a one-on-one relationship with their patients? That is the prediction of Prof. Gigore Burdea, a pioneer in the field of virtual rehabilitation and director of the Rutgers University Tele-Rehabilitation Institute, who spoke recently at an international conference at the University of Haifa.

Read article

One response so far

Jul 26 2009

Maccabiah Games - now and then

Published by Editor under University News

The University congratulates Semion Polinov, a student in the Department of Geography who is also working at the Library’s media division, and Steve Breitstein, former head of the diving workshop at the Leon Recanati Center for Maritime Studies, both of whom competed in this year’s Maccabiah Games.

The University’s Library also has an exceptional archive of photographs from the Second Maccabiah Games that took place in 1935. Continue Reading »

One response so far

Jul 23 2009

81-year-old Auschwitz survivor completes doctorate

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 16, 2009  Clarín (Argentina)

The leading Argentinian newspaper, Clan, carried a story on the 81-year-old Holocaust survivor who recently received his doctarate from the University of Haifa with a thesis on “Forced Laborers in the Third Reich”.

Read article

One response so far

Jul 23 2009

A tale of two autumnal displays

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 21, 2009  BBC

The swathes of beautifully coloured leaves produced by trees each autumn are one of nature’s great displays. But why trees in Europe tend to produce yellow leaves, while those in America and eastern Asia produce red leaves, has remained an enigma. Now scientists have published a theory that could explain the difference. They believe that red-leafed trees in America and Asia only exist because they and their insect pests managed to survive a series of ice ages long ago. So say botanists Simcha Lev-Yadun of the University of Haifa-Oranim, Israel and Jarmo Holopainen of the University of Kuopio in Finland.

Read article

No responses yet

Jul 23 2009

Are Fewer Competitors a Good Thing?

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 21, 2009  Business Week

Apparently, we perform better when there are fewer competitors. In the classroom, at least: Researchers from the University of Michigan and the University of Haifa in Israel (highlighted in The Economist) found that test scores dropped as the number of students in the exam room increased.

Read article

One response so far

Jul 23 2009

How Cannonballs Affected Warship Hull Integrity

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 21, 2009  Softpedia

While observing the thick wooden hull of old warships, experts at the University of Haifa and the Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Ltd. became curious as to how exactly a cannonball fired from a regular cannon could have penetrated the ship’s defenses. They started asking these questions after examining the hull of a 19th century warship that was sunk near Acre, a city in the Western Galilee region of northern Israel. To get some answers, they set up a battle scenario and proceeded to record the parameters of the simulation precisely.

Read article

One response so far

Jul 23 2009

World’s First ‘Self-Watering’ Desert Plant: Desert Rhubarb

Published by Editor under University in the Media

July 21, 2009  Ethiopian Review

Researchers from the Department of Science Education-Biology at the University of Haifa-Oranim have managed to make out the “self-irrigating” mechanism of the desert rhubarb, which enables it to harvest 16 times the amount of water than otherwise expected for a plant in this region based on the quantities of rain in the desert. This is the first example of a self-irrigating desert plant, the scientists say.

Read article

One response so far

Next »